9 Bizarre, Creepy and Odd Things

When I explore BC’s backcountry, backroads and trails I typically encounter stunning forest-clad mountains, rivers, lakes and wildlife. Every now and then, however, I encounter the bizarre, unexplained, odd and even creepy. Check out these nine images and let me know what you think?

I found this demented frog doll on the Greenway trail one Spring. Can you imagine giving this to a child?

These guys thought driving to Goat Island on the Fraser river was a good idea.

I’m not sure what this is about, but apparently there are no moose down this road, west of Vivian Lake.

How did this abandoned van near McPhee road get flipped?

This roofless and doorless cabin is near UNBC.

This strange pipe is 20 km down the Bowron Forest Service Road. I wonder if there is a bunker down there?

An even bigger pipe near McPhee creek. This would make a great shelter!

What’s for dinner?

Smokey keeping the temperature low near Tatlayoko Lake, BC.

 

3 Tips for Warm and Safe Winter Riding

Northern winters are cold. Add two-wheeled adventure, wind chill and sweat and you have a bone chilling recipe.  I wear standard wool or synthetic base layers with a breathable shell (pants and coat), plus thin finger gloves underneath large insulated mitts. However, my feet still get cold even when wearing insulated winter boots.  I have discovered two simple remedies that has extended my riding time during -20 C winter days: insulated water bottles and neoprene socks. These two simple solutions will keep you rolling during cold winter rides.

 INSULATED WATER BOTTLES AND CAGES

Staying hydrated during winter riding not only helps with muscle performance, but also maintains your core temperature. Zefal’s Arctica insulated water bottles give you several hours of unfrozen water even at -20 C. Another option is to keep your water bottle in an insulated water bottle cage. Bar Mitt’s Winter Bot is a bottle cage within a 5 mm neoprene, zippered case. It too, keeps water unfrozen for several hours. Another way to extend your water life is to fill your bottle with HOT WATER. It’s free and actually works. It will also help to increase your core temperature.

NEOPRENE SOCKS

Neoprene socks act as vapor barriers preventing evaporation and cooling. I wear Mountain Equipment Co Op’s inexpensive, three millimeter sock over a merino wool wicking sock. A wicking layer is critical because you want to minimize the amount of sweat clinging to your feet. I can ride longer and more comfortably with neoprene socks.

ICE CLEATS

Freeze-thaw cycles are now a regular part of northern BC winters. Well used trails –especially those with a south aspect and open forest canopy—often ice over long before spring. Frozen lakes sometimes have shear ice or only a thin layer of uncohesive powder. These slippery situations can be avoided by wearing strap on cleats. I wear heel cleats on my cold winter boots and full-length cleats on my low cuts during warmer weather. Ice cleats allow you to get on and off of your bike without that annoying lateral slippage and they are essential for steep icy sections.

Devisys anti-slip Heelstops

COSCO full length rubber ice cleats

Neoprene socks and insulated water bottles will extend your winter rides. Ice cleats, will minimize dangerous slips on icy trails. However, acclimatization is also critical. Keep riding, even at -25 C. Wear lots of layers, and start peeling them off as your body temperature increases. Your body will eventually adapt and when it warms up, you will be riding with just a base layer, sweater and long tights!

For more info on winter fatbiking check out my post Winter Fatbike Fun at Outbound.com. Also, join my Facebook page Fatbike Freaks and get the latest info about fatbikes, gear and winter riding. 

Tsus Lakes Day Trip

The Tsus Lakes are a tiny lake chain in the heart of the northern Caribou mountains. Nestled between Spring mountain’s three peaks and an unnamed pyramid-shaped mountain to the south, this  valley has some fantastic views and is  an  easy 25 km ride from the parking area.  The Tsus Lakes are perfect for the adventure mountain biker or bikepacker.

The Tsus Lakes valley is west of the Bowron river and only 62 km east of Prince George. Turn on the Cutoff Road Forest Service Road on the south side of the highway just before the Bowron River bridge. You can either park by the highway pullout or a few kilometers down the road at the Coalmine Forest Service Road junction.

Matt and I picked a cool and sunny fall day to explore this area. The Coalmine FSR runs east towards the Bowron river, then south. The first dozen kilometers are characterized by a rolling plateau through stands of young lodgepole pine, aspen and some spruce. We found some cool sand dunes on the east side of the road, not far from where we parked. Matt was thrilled to ride his brand new fatbike on these dunes. A lone wolf liked the dunes as well!

An interesting mountain peak in the Bowron river valley.

Looking west towards Spring mountain. There is a great campsite at this un-named lake.Some snow-capped mountains off in the distance. The access road to the Tsus Lakes valley is a deactivated road that branches off of the Coalmine FSR. This is a rarely used road that narrows to ATV width. All the culverts and bridges have been removed which  makes for some fun stream crossings.

A narrow track winds through the trees down to the campsite on northern most lake. There are some great views of the tree clad mountains to the west. It is unusual to see un-logged terrain anywhere in the Prince George region. There is a great campsite beside the lake as well.

As you ride west along the lake chain, you begin to gain elevation. The toe slope on the east side has transitional welt-belt ecosystems with mature western red cedar,  hemlock and a thick moss-covered forest floor.

As you approach the last lake,  the trail becomes crowded with alder saplings. Be sure to wear eye and hand protection.

The sun was behind us on the ride home. I’m always smiling when riding.

With picturesque lakes, forest-clad slopes and snow-covered mountain peaks, the Tsus Lakes area is fantastic for day-tripping  or overnight bike camping. Be sure to use Google Earth for route planning and carry a SPOT GPS Device when riding.
If your interested in some stellar riding in the Rocky Mountains then go to Three Must Explore Mountain Towns on Flightnetwork.com’s travel blog.
You can learn about blogging or publishing your adventures, at UNBC’s upcoming Outdoor Adventure Writing and Blogging Workshop at our Prince George campus. Taught by veteran adventurer Vivien Lougheed, this class and field-based workshop will help you take transform your outdoor experiences and photos into a compelling written narrative.

War Falls to Carp Lake Provincial Park

This stunning waterfall is only a 2.5 hour drive northwest of Prince George. With roadside parking, a smooth 1 km single-track through a spruce and fir forest and accessible swimming, War Falls on the McLeod River may be the best waterfall in the region. If you add a 10 km ride to Carp Lake, you have a great summer day trip for the adventure mountain biker!

From Prince George, drive approximately 2 hours north on the Yellowhead Highway and follow the signs west into the First Nations community of McLeod Lake. Cross the bridge, drive past the large gas bar and continue west on Carp Lake road. For the first few km’s, the well-maintained gravel road runs through a logged area, then narrows and winds through the timber until the trail head at the 23 km mark. This narrow section is quite scenic.

Single-track trail heading down into the river valleyFirst set of falls

Second set of falls

The last set of falls can be observed from a small platform with access to a rocky beach

Looking downstream to the northeast

We met Luke and Nicole at the falls. They walked into the falls with their clothes and boots on and swam around for quite a while. We spent several hours swimming in the falls and exploring the riparian area, downstream. Carp Lake Provincial Park is an easy ride approximately 10 km west of the falls. War Lake is half-way between the falls and Carp Lake. It has a nice beach and camping area.

My typical speed on my Specialized Fatboy fatbike

Carp Lake is a wilderness lake, with only one access. There are campsites, up on a bench, along the eastern edge of the lake. Small trails descend 50 or so meters to docks along the lake. There are also campsites that you can boat to.

Chillin on the dockDwarf Blueberries alongside the road

Fore more information about War Falls and Carp Lake Provincial Park go to:

Carp Lake & War Falls

Nuxalk-Carrier Grease Trail Day Trip

No, the Nuxalk-Carrier Grease Trail is not a slick, clayey brake clogging trail, but rather one that runs from the Fraser River, south of Prince George, to Bella Coola, west of the coast mountains. The grease is “Oolichan oil,” or the oil extracted by First Nations from a tiny ocean fish called the Oolichan (candle fish). This precious commodity was traded between coastal and interior First Nations via. an extensive trail network. Alexander Mackenzie utilized this trail (after being guided by local First Nations) on his famous expedition to the Pacific in the 1770s. Hence the trails secondary name: the Alexander Mackenzie Trail.

I accessed the trail at the 107 km on the Batnuni Forest Service Road. This single-track and ATV trail winds through some beautiful country and makes a fantastic day trip for the adventure rider.

This trail begins on a narrow bench of pine and spruce, paralleling the road,  then quickly descends into a lowland with a series of wetlands of varying size, just north of Cotsworth Lake. Almost immediately you have to cross a slow moving creek-so be prepared to get wet.

Creek crossing # 1.

After the first crossing, the trail runs along a small ridge that skirts most of the wetlands. The grass covered trail and white trembling aspens contrast sharply against the blue sky and grey waters.

Eventually, you have to cross another creek, this one was thigh deep and running a lot faster. Check out the video of my dangerous river crossing!

 Getting Wet

This unnamed lake has a great campsite.

 Unless you want to join Alice in Wonderland, I don’t recommend eating the Panther amanitas growing alongside the trail

Yarrow grows alongside the trail. At approximately 6 kms the trail crosses another channel between two wetlands, just south of the east end of Titetown Lake. While only two feet deep, this crossing is about 60 meters wide!

Scattered alongside of the trail are many trees with old blazes on them. Called Culturally Modified Trees (CMT) by Archaeologists, some of these trees were scarred by local First Nations (Nazko) to mark the location of a trail or to harvest cambium (inner bark), an important source of carbohydrates. Some are so old that they have completely healed over.

Time to dry out the shorts.

You can ride the Nuxalk-Carrier Grease trail aprroximately 20 km to Kluskoil Lake, and farther,  or take the ATV track the ascends onto a ridge that runs along the east side of Titetown Lake. This part of the trail affords some great views of the lake and the Nechako plateau as well as the tiny community that lives nearby.

Titetown Lake community.

An ever present reminder that bikes will outlive cars!

The Nuxalk-Carrier Grease Trail is a smooth relaxing ride through some beautiful wetland and lake country only a couple hours south of Prince George. It has numerous campsites, good access and is rarely used. For more info about this trail go to..

Grease Trail

Alexander Mackenzie Trail

Grizzly Bear (Red) Mnt. Weekend

Well known for its Grizzly bears and caribou, Grizzly Bear  or Red Mnt. towers over the historic community of Penny, a couple hours east of Prince George. To the west, of this peak is a fully stocked public cabin primarily used by backcountry skiers. The 12 km ride into this cabin is ideal for the self-sufficient adventure mountain biker who is willing to gravel grind up some tough trails. This cabin provides great access into the McGregor Mnts. alpine tundra and views of extensive subalpine parkland.

First opened in 1916, the Penny post office serviced the community that developed alongside the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. Today, mail is delivered to the 10 or so people that live in this community via the CN Railway Company.
The route (ignore my detour to the west of the main trail).

This ATV width trail begins just few hundred meters north of the post office and winds through a rolling bench for several kms then descends into Red Mnt. Creek. This area is the northern tip of BC’s Temperate Inland Rainforest and is dominated by large, old western red cedars. Riding through these towering cedars is like riding through the columns in a  medieval cathedral.

This cabin was closed for the season.

Time to load up on the carbs.

Like the trail itself, the railing of the Red Mnt. Creek bridge appears to go on forever.

Eventually the trail leaves the rolling toe slope and switchbacks steeply upslope for several kms. There are some good  viewpoints of the Fraser River and the McGregor Mnts. to the south.Where’s the trail?

Be prepared to push your bike uphill from the 10.5 km marker to the cabin at 12 km. This section is the steepest part of the ride and my legs simply couldn’t do it, but maybe yours could.
At 3200 feet elevation, you  get great views of the subalpine parkland to the north.
At 5000 feet you begin to descend into a depression where the cabin is located.

After 6 hours and 19 minutes I finally arrived at the cabin!

So why did I haul my camp stove and pot uphill for 6 hours? This cabin is fully stocked with everything you need to spend the night (except your food and clothes).

A killer view from the dillapitated outhouse. Please note that there was no toilet paper!

The trail through towering cedars, views,  access to subalpine parkland and the “all inclusive” cabin makes this grueling 12 km ride worthwhile. While I didn’t see any grizzly bear, I did see a white wolf on the ride down: perhaps a good sign for my next adventure? For more information about this trail and the public cabin check out:

Prince George Backcountry Recreation Society

For a detailed trail guide you can purchase Rob Bryce’s book “Hiking North Central BC,” available at a bookstore near you:

Order Here

Goat-River Gong Show & McBride Mnt. Madness

McBride Mnt., located approximately 2.5 hrs east of Prince George, is a tough climb but has some interesting alpine areas to explore as well as fantastic views of the Rocky Mnts. and Robson Valley. On the drive we decided to drop in at the Goat River historic trail for a bit of a warm up.

Dave and I geared up on a cool and cloudy Saturday afternoon

The Goat River Trail was first used by First Nations as a route between the Upper Fraser River and the Bowron Lakes area. CPR surveyors and miners kept this trail open during the mid to late-1800s. We accessed the trail at the parking lot adjacent to the outlet of the Milk River. However, it became clear that this trail was not MTB friendly.

The junction of the Milk and Goat River

Quartz CreekDave crushin it through dense thimbleberry, alder and cow parsnip

The trail was characterized by muddy, brush-covered single-track with large smooth slippery boulders and skinny’s over marshy, mucky sections. Dave bailed and later told me that he had bruised ribs from a soccer game:/ We pushed our bikes most of the time. After a couple of kms we decided to take a quick picture at the Goat River and head back. Note to self: this is a hiking trail only! Off to McBride Mnt.

While one could ride the full 12 km road to the start of the alpine, we decided to park at the 6 km cabin where we would spend the night.

The road up McBride Mnt. is hard packed sand and gravel, with many sections of loose gravels and stones with exposed angular bed rock. It is also steep, running minimum 7% and some times up to 15% slope.

Typical steep switch back

The views improve as you ascend the mountain

It was raining in the Robson Valley as we road out of the subalpine

At 12 km, we began a tough 2 km push into the alpine. The summit of McBride Mnt. was in the clouds.

Looking west at an alpine ridge

Made it to the rebuilt fire lookout

The weather began to turn as we reached the fire lookout. The temperature dropped to about 5 degrees C  and the wind picked up. We decided to head back to the cabin. It snowed in the alpine later that weekend. Needless to say the 8 km downhill ride was fast and bumpy-my hands were aching by the time we reached the cabin.

This is one of the best, easily accessed campsites that I have every been to. Check out the views…

Looking south into the Rockies

Sweet and spicy peanut sauce on rice noodles with pepperoni. A bikepacking standard for me.

Getting out of the rain

While Dave and I were setting up camp, two guys rolled in on road bikes. Meet John and Brad: two Californians who came to BC to ride all of its toughest mountain peaks (25 I think). They are part of a cycling community called Pjammcycling. They had no idea that the road up McBride Mnt. was unpaved-but they road it anyways. We had a chat, shared some dinner  and wished them well. These guys are hard core!

McBride Mnt. is a tough ride, but provides awesome access to the alpine and great camping. For more info check out:

McBride Peak Info

Pjammacycling

Willow River Bikepack

The Willow River Canyon area, just east of Prince George, is a fantastic bikepacking destination, perfect for a weekend adventure. Join us as we ride the Tabor Mt. trails east to the canyon and then down into the Willow River.

The Tabor Mt. Recreation Area is 25 km’s east of Prince George and is bounded by Hwy. 16 to the north, Buckhorn Rd. to the south and the Willow River, to the east. You can access this well maintained trail network at Tabor Mt. Ski Hill. Kyrke and I began our trip at the ski hill access, where we geared up and road up onto the West Touring trail. This trail runs along the toe-slope of Tabor Mt. to the X-Country ski area parking lot. This ATV width trail is characterized by rolling terrain with short uphill sections: perfect for a fatbike with 40 lbs of gear.

Kyrke getting his gear organized.

A typical section of trail.

This area receives lots of  rainwater  runoff and seepage from numerous upslope springs, therefore, it is lush and jungle like. Cow parsnip, black twinberry, raspberry, Goat’s beard and some Devil’s club (watch out) crowd the trail–making the ride an intense visual and olfactory experience. These sections are my favorite.

A meadow with Cow parsnip and Ox-eyed daisy’s.

The West Touring trail runs for 2 km until the x-country ski area parking lot. We continued east along the Hickory Wing Trail then followed the East Touring Trail, over Bowes Creek, then upslope along the Martin Trail.

 Bowes Creek bridge.

The Martin Trail and Willow River Canyon Trail junction.

At this point we had to backtrack because the Willow River Canyon Trail was covered with blown-down timber. We took a side access trail (Martin Trail connector) that ran north to Hwy. 16. We then followed Hwy. 16 east until England Creek Forest Service Road. A couple hundred meters down this road is the England Creek bridge. A single-track trail on the north side of the bridge runs east to the Willow River. At the junction of England Creek and the Willow is a great campsite that gives you access to the shore.

 Looking south down the Willow River Canyon from the England Creek campsite.

A small waterfall on the England.

From here simply rode back to the Hwy. and then east for a few km’s until the Willow North Forest Service road. This road will take you to several access points along the Willow.

This large camping area provides hundred of meters of riverfront access and is suitable for tents and hammocks. There is plenty of dead fall, so firewood is available. One way to reduce weight while bikepacking is to not carry a stove. I cook all my meals over a fire.

Collecting firewood by bike.

There is nothing better than chiliin out with a cold beer in BC’s wilderness!

 

Sunset over the Willow.

 We rode the full 48 km’s back to Prince George. This is a relatively easy ride and the westbound shoulder is wide enough that one feels safe. One interesting stop along the way is the Tabor Mt. Wildlife Viewing platform. This area is on the north side of the road, adjacent the Martin Trail connector. Accessed by a 200 meter single-track trail that runs through a young stand of aspen, spruce and fir, this viewing platform provides some nice visual corridors of Tabor Mt.

 

Looking southwest towards Tabor Mt.

Tabor Mt. and the Willow River Canyon are a great accessible adventure biking area, that are close to town. They are ideal if you just getting into bikepacking or want a  a relatively easy weekend trip. Please note that there are grizzly and black bears in this area as well as cougar and wolves. My best advice would be to make lots of noise and carry bear spray. Also, let people know where you will be going and carry a SPOT GPS device. For more info on this area check out:

Tabor Mt. Recreation Society

Check out some of the other fantastic rivers in this area at my FlightNetwork blog post The 3 Best Rivers in Northern BC to See

Big Wheels-Big Sky: Cariboo-Chilcotin by Fat Bike

Northern BC has great riding, but sometimes you have to head south to ride  dry, dusty trails and experience the wide-open “big sky country” vistas. Last weekend I spent three days exploring the Cariboo-Chilcotin’s trails and back country and I wasn’t disappointed. My riding began in 108 Mile House and ended near Junction Sheep Provincial Park on the Chilcotin Plateau. Check out my ride!

108 Mile House Trail Network

This ominous looking tunnel is the entrance way to  a huge network of single/double track, ATV and road-width trails at the 108 Mile House historic site, on the east side of  Hwy. 97. The trail heads east towards Sucker Lake through rolling grassy meadows, with patches of aspen and Douglas fir. There are some short uphill sections on the east side of the lake and plenty of grassy range land to explore.

Typical single-track and x-country ski trails.

You can spend hours riding and exploring the small ridges that run north-south throughout the range land. I did a 20 km loop around Sucker Lake.

Sucker Lake.

Chasm Provincial Park

If you had shown me this picture two weeks ago, I wouldn’t have believed that it was in BC! Chasm Provincial Park, south of 100 Mile House, is  a 3000  hectare valley and plateau that was carved out of a massive lava flow, by water,10 million years ago. Ponderosa pine and Douglas fir cover the rocky crags that are home to big horn sheep and mule deer.

An ATV width-trail runs along the south rim of the park then loops around through grassy Douglas fir and ponderosa pine stands. You get a great view of the canyon for almost 5 kms of trail. If you are brave enough to walk to the edge you can see where the sheep walked up the cliff onto the rim. The sheep come to feed on the pinegrass that grows beneath the trees.

 

A partial skull and vertebrae of a Bighorn sheep.

Lots of interesting old buildings and equipment litter the Cariboo landscape.

Bonaparte River Area

The Bonaparte River lies to the north of Chasm and has a fantastic rec site where I spent the night. The beer and spicy-peanut sauce on rice noodles was fantastic.

Junction Sheep Range Provincial Park Area

This park overlooks the junction of the Fraser and Chilcotin river and is only a 35 minute drive from Williams Lake. Bordered by a working cattle ranch, this plateau gently slopes to the south and is covered by lush grasslands and stands of Douglas fir and aspen.

In the background is the road to Bella Coola and in the foreground is a kick ass ridge top single track that runs for kilometers to the valley bottom.

The viewscapes are stunning and non-stop. Looking east.

Looking South.

Looking towards the park. Prickly pear cactus grows along the edge of the trail on south facing slopes–so watch your tires and shoes.

Heart-leaved arnica grows in grassy meadows underneath the fir trees.

If your lucky you may see a mountain bluebird on a high perch!

Allow yourself a full day to ride this area. Also note that the land adjacent to the access road is private and no-go. Riders are not the only users: there was a group pf backcountry horse packers there as well. Interesting comparison between hoof impacts and fat tires….

The scenery, riding, and ecosystems of BC’s Cariboo-Chilcotin area are second to none. At the end of a hard hot day of riding you can also enjoy the sunsets.

Tabor Mountain Recreation Area: Prince George’s Best Kept Mountain Biking Secret

If you like a little more adventure, and are willing to ride trails wider than a breadbox, you will love the Tabor Mt. Recreation area, just 20 minutes East of Prince George. Last week Dean and I planned an epic 30 km ride that began with a 7 km climb to the  old fire lookout. You can see our proposed route below.

Tabor Mt. was the scene of a massive wildfire in 1961 that burned thousands of acres of timber. Subsequent salvage logging and reforestation efforts left a patch work of roads all over the mountain. At one of the mill sites you can still see a massive sawdust pile.

In 1973, this area was designated as a multi-use recreation area. Since then, several user groups have maintained and expanded the trails. These trails are typically one-vehicle or ATV width, with no crowns or side ditching. While there are several culverts on some trails, there is plenty of surface water in the spring. The 5 km uphill to the Beaver Pond Shelter was gut-wrenching, too say the least, however, this scenic shelter and pond made the ride worthwhile. This is an awesome camping spot.

 

 

The mountain had other plans for us:  the next two km’s was a treacherous trail that had turned into a stream covered with 3 feet of snow!

 

It was tough  pushing  fat bikes up snow covered streams/trails. However, the large wheel diameter and width made it much easier than a conventional mountain bike.

When we reached the ridge top, just below the summit, we were greeted by a large beaver pond that cut our trail in two. I was soaked by this point. We carefully crossed the pond along the narrow dam and bushwhacked through the the timber on the other side. Needles to say we did not ride the trail running south around the mountain, but headed down the nearest  trail.

Tabor Mt. has numerous species of wildlife including black and grizzly bears, wolf, and cougar as well as moose. In the past, have found bear, wolf and cougar tracks on the same trail. The black bears were already out of hibernation walking the same trail we were riding (or attempting to ride).

Tabor Mt. and the Buckhorn area to the south has 100s of km’s of ATV tracks and old roads that can be explored for a day or several if you like sleeping in the bush.I think that this trail network is the best multi-use “front-country” recreation area in the region.

For more information check out…

Tabor Mt. Recreation Society

For those of you who work or play in the bush, UNBC Continuing Studies provides a wide range of field based courses from 1 day workshops to three week certificates. To find out more go to….

UNBC Continuing Studies