Meanskinisht Cemetery & Cedarvale

On our “Skeena River Historical Journey by Jet Boat” we will retrace the route of the mighty sternwheelers that navigated the Skeena River in  the late 1800’s and the early 1900’s.  The trip from Hazelton to Cassiar Cannery will focus a lot on the history and visiting some of the more interesting sites along the river.  One of the stops will be the community of Meanskinisht or Cedarvale as it is more commonly known as now.  Meanskinisht was founded in 1888 by Anglican Missionary Robert Tomlinson who had previously served at Metlakatla and Kincolith on the north coast. Tomlinson ran a very strict religious community which attracted first nations from around the region. The community was referred to as the “Holy City”.  Sundays were a day of rest and not even the Sternwheelers were welcome to stop to drop off mail on those days.  Robert Tomlinson’s wife was named Alice of which the name “Alice Arm” came from (coincidentally we visit Alice Arm on our Ghost Towns of Northwest BC Tour). We will have local community members Lyle and Mary Dahlen tour us through the Meanskinisht cemetery and the museum.

Meanskinisht Cemetery
Second Meanskinisht Church destroyed by by in 1950’s (Tomlinson Collection – Regional District of Kitimat-Stikine)
Gravesite of Alice and Robert Tomlinson in the Meanskinisht Cemetery
Gravesite of Alice and Robert Tomlinson in the Meanskinisht Cemetery

Woodcock Airstrip

During our Skeena River Historical Jet Boat Journey tour Aug 5-10, 2016 we will make our way from Hazelton to Port Edward over 5 days. Each day we we will visit some of the more interesting historical sites along the way. One of these that lies adjacent to the Skeena River near Cedarvale is the old Woodcock Airstrip. The Airstrip was built in the 40’s as a relief landing field by the Military. It was used by the cadets as a base for their operations as well but has now fell into disrepair. Here are a few photos of the airstrip.

Woodcock airstrip
Woodcock Airstrip from the ground
Woodcock Airstrip