Inside the Anyox Powerhouse- “Then & Now”

The Anyox Powerhouse is always one of the highlights for guests on the “Town that got Lost” tour!.  Even though a lot  of the equipment inside was removed it is still a surreal experience with all the rusted iron and steel remnants providing a glimpse into the past.  Amazingly a few plants and shrubs have taken root amongst the industrial wasteland, giving it an even eerier feeling.
Anyox Powerhouse Then & Now
Anyox Powerhouse Then & Now

Constructed in 1911, Powerhouse No. 1 was the heart of the mining and community operations, providing electricity for the smelter, machine shops and other mining operations, as well as the town, until the mine closed in 1936. Secondary powerhouses and substations in the mine site produced electricity for the ore-haulage railway trolleys and other equipment. Constructed of brick and steel, 50 feet wide by 180 feet long, the building’s concrete foundations are laid on solid rock. Brick for the Powerhouse was originally imported from Sidney Island. Later brick, for refurbishing the building, was likely produced at the brickworks on the Anyox site. The building is a massive, elegant structure with an unobstructed interior volume. Ten bays with curved window openings and clerestory windows along both sides of the upper portion of the roof contribute to an impressive facade. A 15-ton crane, used to move the machinery, runs the entire length of the interior of the building.

Looking down into the Anyox Powerhouse
Looking down into the Anyox Powerhouse
The outside brick walls of the Anyox Powerhouse
The outside brick walls of the Anyox Powerhouse
An old Pelton Wheel inside the Anyox Powerhouse
An old Pelton Wheel inside the Anyox Powerhouse
Looking through through the roof of Anyox Powerhouse
Looking through through the roof of Anyox Powerhouse