The Tragedy of Wilfred Sheldon Teabo

One of the highlights to the Ghost Town of Anyox is the Graveyard.  It is now overgrown with mature trees but amazingly little else grows under the trees as the area suddenly opens up and is devoid of vegetation once entering the cemetery.  On my first visit to Anyox when we did a reconnaissance trip to source out unique things to see fro the guests.  I was with the owner of the town and it had been many years since he had been to the cemetery.  He had a basic idea where it was but it still took us two hours of bushwacking to find the site.  That is how seldom visited this place is.  We then spent two days brushing out a path for the guests to walk into the graveyard and keep it cleared every year.

One of the first headstones you will see is that of 8 year old Wilfred Sheldon Teabo.  He was a young boy who tragically drowned in the toxic waters of Fall Creek.  Read the caption below from the book “The Town that got Lost” for more information on his death.

The cemetery is about one km for the ocean.  The bottom historic photo show the cemetery and the faint white crosses at the base of the hill.

We still have a few spots left in our two day Anyox tour June 3-4, 2017 or June 10-11, 2017. Don’t miss an opportunity to visit one of BC’s largest towns from the early 1900’s

The gravesite of Wilfred Teabo at Anyox
Caption about Wilfred Teabo from the book the “Town that Got Lost”

 

Anyox cemetery crosses at the end of the street
The Town that got lost Book

The Anyox Dam Then and Now!

The Anyox Dam Then and Now!

Our Two day “Anyox – The town that got Lost” tour June 3-4, 2017 and June 10-11, 2017  will visit this iconic structure that is till standing almost 100 years later.  It was Canada’s tallest dam at one time and is still an amazing structure.   Don’t miss your chance to be on of the few people to visit this iconic structure.

The dam was completed in 1923 and was built by hauling pallets of concrete bags up a single guauge railway line operated by electric hoists. The dam is 635 ft long and 137 ft high and 28 000 acre ft of water capacity. In 1923 before the dam was complete heavy rains caused a landslide above the dam and the debris from the slide plugged the penstocks and the water level rose to dangerous levels so much so that they had to evacuate people living in the lower parts of Anyox below. The water eventually subsided and the dam was completed.

Building the Anyox Dam
Building the Anyox Dam
The Anyox Dam today!
Aerial View of the Anyox Dam

 

Anyox dam
The Anyox dam

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The Guests of Ghost Towns 2016

On all of our trips our guest really make the trips. We have had so many interesting people participate in the tours and it has been great to get to know them over a short period. Many of them are repeat guests that are coming back for another tour the following year. We always like to to take a lot of photos on the tours for marketing purposes and many of these now include photos of guests participating in the tours. Here are some photos from last August’s Ghost Towns of Northwest BC Tour. This year’s tour is starting to fill up and will be another great tour to some of northwest BC’s most remote and inaccessible Ghost Towns.

2016 Ghost Town Guests posing in front of Kitsault sign
Exploring the inside of the Anyox Dam
2016 Ghost Town Guests in front of the Dorreen Store
2016 Ghost Town Guests going into the Alice Arm School
2016 Ghost Town Guests checking out the pilings at low tide
Enroute to Anyox to aboard the Raincoast Explorer
Checking out Ringbolts in Kitselas Canyon
Guests posing in the the Kitsault Maple Leaf Pub
Exploring Anyox Powerhouse
Guests Exploring Kitselas Historic Site
Guests waiting for the stores to open in the Kitsault Mall
Guests enjoying a meal at Alice Arm provided by the locals
Photographing in the Anyox Cemetery
Guests paying for a bottel of water at the Kitsault Grocery store
Guests waiting for the movie to start in the Kitsault Movie theatre

 

 

 

The Concrete Walls of Anyox

The Ghost Town of Anyox has all kinds of remnants from its days as a copper mine in the early 19th century but after the town was shut down in in 1935 and a fire roared through the town in 1942 the majority of the buildings that survived were the one made of  steel and concrete. A jungly forest has grown up inside and out of the remains which makes the buildings even more eerie.  Here are a few of the buildings and the concrete walls that still remain.  If you are looking for a unique “Off the Beaten Path” adventure then check out our  “The Town That Got Lost” Anyox Exploration June 3-4, 2017 or the “Ghost Towns of Northwest BC” tour August 21-27, 2017.

Anyox Coke Plant Wall
Forest View at Anyox
Anyox Window
Anyox Old Door

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Guests exploring the Anyox Dam

One of the highlights of visiting the Ghost Town of Anyox is the trip up to the Anyox Dam or Dam#2as the residents called it. The dam is about 4 km up a winding road that eventually drops down to the site. It is a truly awe inspiring moment when you come around a corner and see this massive concrete structure located in a small valley 120 miles north of Prince Rupert down Observatory inlet. The dam was completed in 1923 and was built by hauling pallets of concrete bags up a single guauge railway line operated by electric hoists. The dam is 635 ft long and 137 ft high and 28 000 acre ft of water capacity. In 1923 before the dam was complete heavy rains caused a landslide above the dam and the debris from the slide plugged the penstocks and the water level rose to dangerous levels so much so that they had to evacuate people living in the lower parts of Anyox below. The water eventually subsided and the dam was completed.
we will be visiting the dam on our brand new two day “Anyox – The town that got lost” tour June 3-4, 2017 and on our Ghost Towns of Northwest BC Tour August 21-17, 2017. Don’t miss your chance to be on of the few people to visit this iconic structure.

Inside the Anyox Dam
The Anyox dam
The top of the Anyox dam
Guests checking out the arches of the dam
Photographing inside the Anyox Dam
Admiring the Anyox dam
A guest photographing the architecture of the dam

 

 

 

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UNBC Adventure Tours Jet Boat Safety

On our UNBC Adventure Tours guest safety is one of our main concerns. With many of our tours utilizing jet boats we must enure the drivers have a vast amount of experience driving jet boats and familiarity with the rivers and ocean that we take guests up. We many pre-trip inspections of the waters we venture into to ensure we do not incur any surprises. One of our drivers is Terrace resident Fred Seiler and owner of Northwest Jet Boat Services http://northwestjetboat.ca/.  Fred has thousands of hours of experience on the rivers and also instructs our UNBC Jet Boat Safety course.  Our guests are in good hands with Fred at the helm of the jet boat.

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Anyox General Store

The Anyox General store was one of two stores in the community.  It was the company store that was owned and ran by the Granby Compaany.  The other store was “Franks” or Frank Lew Luns and it was one of the only non company owned buildings in the town.  The General store got shipments of fresh fruit, vegetables and milk twice a week.  An interesting side note is that the company did try and have fresh milk by bringing in 12 dairy cows but the Smelter killed off all the vegetation in Anyox and there was no grass for them forage on and they were eventually condemned for being sickly and sent to the incinerator. The store really was the hub of the town and on saturdays and paydays it was bustling with activity.  The store sits on the ocean and is one of the first structures one sees when entering Granby Bay,  It is 117 ft long and 60 ft wide and three stories high. It sold groceries, postoffice, clothing, furnishings etc.   The store is an eerie place now as a forest of trees has taken over where the rows of canned goods and ladies fashions once sat.  The branches have climbed there way through the roof and windows and break the beams of sunlight that try and penetrate the floor.

Anyox general store
Anyox general store today
Sun shining through the remains of the Anyox Store
Front of the Anyox general store

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New! “The Town That Got Lost” – Anyox Exploration Tour

June 3-4, 2017
Terrace, BC
$695.00
  Includes all accommodations, meals and transportation

This is another new tour we have added this year and is guaranteed to fill up fast.  We already visit the exclusive ghost town of Anyox on our 5 day tour but we have had a lot of requests for an extended exclusive visit to this 100 year old copper mining town.

Explore the Anyox Coke Plant

This unique two day tour visits the remote and historic Mining Town of Anyox.  We have special permission to explore this exclusive location on BC’s northcoast.  The remoteness and history of this fabled town will amaze even those without an interest in the eerie past of these boom and bust communities.

Be one of the few people to ever explore the Anyox Dam
The Anyox Powerhouse

Anyox which has been referred to as the “The Town that got Lost” was a once thriving mining town which had over 3000 residents in 1914.  It has now been uninhabited for the past 80 years but what remains in this ghost town is truly amazing!  Remains of Canada’s once largest dam, the Anyox Powerhouse, coke plant, steam plant, concentrator, smelter stacks, old railway cars, general store, cemetery, red light district, golf course, and more will keep  us busy for two days.  We are fortunate to be able to spend the night in this historic and eerie ghost town. Be one of only a handful of people to visit this town this year!

Guests on this tour will get to explore items like this from the Anyox Red Light District

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2017 Northern B.C. Adventure Tour Dates Just Released

2017 UNBC Continuing Studies
Northern B.C. Adventure Tours

NOW OPEN  FOR REGISTRATION!

A one-of-a-kind experience. Since 2014, UNBC Continuing Studies has been offering awe-struck adventurers rare access to seldom-visited historic sites, wondrous wildlife, and stunning natural scenery that is distinctly Northern British Columbia. See our list of past and new tours that are now open for registration.  Check back daily for blog posts on all of the tours!
 
Sturgeon caught for research purposes Fraser River White Sturgeon Tour

Upper Fraser White Sturgeon Biology Experience
May 4-5, 2017
Prince George, BC

Canneries of the Northcoast
May 8-June 11, 2017
Cassiar Cannery, Port Edward, BC

Cassiar Cannery Canneries of the North Coast Tour

Historic Fort George River Journey
May 15 or June 17, 2017
Prince George, BC

Historic Ft George Canyon Historic Ft George River Journey Tour

The Port Essington Experience
May 27, 2017
Terrace, BC

The Port Essington Experience Tour

“The Town That Got Lost” Anyox Exploration
June 3-4, 2017
Terrace, BC

The Anyox Powerhouse “The Town That Got Lost” Anyox Exploration Tour

Northwest BC Grizzly Bear Discovery Tour
June 6-10, 2017
Terrace, BC

Grizzly Bear walking the shore Northwest BC Grizzly Bear Discovery Tour

Skeena River Historical Jet Boat Journey
August 1-6, 2017
Hazelton – Port Edward, BC

Navigating the 200 km trip down the Skeena River Skeena River Historical Jet Boat Journey Tour

Ghost Towns of Northwest BC
August 20-26, 2017
Terrace, BC

The Ghostly and Abandoned Kitsault Shopping Centre Ghost Towns of Northwest BC Tour
Combining the knowledge of local experts with unique destinations and activities, Continuing Studies’ jet boat tours will provide you a spectacular story all your own.
 
“It was indeed one of the best travel and educational experiences that I have encountered.”
–          Ron Paull
For more information check out our Blog or our website http://www.unbc.ca/continuing-studies/courses-workshops
or contact Rob Bryce at (250) 960-5982 or rob.bryce@unbc.ca

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