Webb Bennett – Kitselas Canyon Historic Site on the Skeena River

The Kitselas Canyon Historic site and home of the Kitselas First Nation is 15 minutes east of Terrace on the banks of the Skeena River.  The highlights include the longhouses, petroglyphs, totem poles, lookout, dugout canoe, interpretive signs and the flora and fauna.  None of these highlights would be complete without the interpretive knowledge and background provided by the curator Webb Bennett.

Webb is a wealth of knowledge and can tell you anything about the history of the area.  He shares his knowledge and shows us the sites as we wind along a path through the beautiful hemlock forest.  He talks about the totem poles and longhouses and how totems are a way for the Kitselas and other first nations to tell their stories as their history isn’t written down anywhere. The experience at the site is hands on as Webb  mentions “It’s a living cultural centre”.  The tour of the longhouses greatly benefits from this belief as the participants can hold and touch the various items on display to get a better feel of the work that went into making them.

We visit the Kitselas Canyon Historic site on a few of our tours.

Skeena River Historic Journey August 1-6, 2017

Ghost Towns of Northwest BC August 20-26, 2017

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Kitselas Canyon Historic site UNBC tour
Our transportation to the Canyon
Kitselas Canyon Historic site UNBC tour
Webb Bennett talking about the Kitselas History
Kitselas Canyon Historic site UNBC tour
The hands on living cultural Centre of Kitselas Canyon
Kitselas Canyon Historic site UNBC tour at the longhouse
Webb explaining the crest to our group
Kitselas Canyon Historic site UNBC tour
Webb Bennett talking to one of our tour groups

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Adventure Tour Guide Fred Seiler

Many of our Adventure Tours through Continuing Studies focus on accessing remote and rarely visited sites and to do this we utilize Jet Boats.  Running a jet boat with guests who are relying on their guide to bring them back safely after each days adventure requires someone with a vast amount of experience and skill.  For our tours in Northwest BC we utilize the services of Fred Seiler who has thousands of hours of jet boating and experience exploring the rivers of this magnificent region.  His past experience in delivering eco tours and commercial jet boat services is invaluable.  Fred also teaches a Jet Boat safety course for us and has also taught me a vast amount about the safe driving of jet boats and shared all kinds of information about areas to explore and adventure in Northwest BC.  Here are a  few photos of Fred in action on our tours.

Fred Seiler calling wolves up the river valley
Fred Seiler helping a guest with some photography tips
Fred getting ready to navigate the river with his jet boat
Fred calling wolves
Fred running his boat up the river
On the lookout for feeding Grizzly Bears
Fred Seiler explaining the importance of a Rice Root to the local bears

All you ever wanted to know about Sternwheeler Cordwood

A big part of the history of the Skeena River and Upper Fraser River involved the use of Sternwheelers to transport people, equipment, supplies, furs and food up and down the rivers which were the main transportation routes.  Almost all of the sternwheelers used wood to fed the boilers which in turn powered the large paddles at the rear of the ship.  Wood was a readily available resource that grew adjacent  to the river and could easily be cut and split into 3-4 ft sections and piled into cords by local contractors.  The term Cordwood became part of everyday language as it was a necessity for every day travel.  The cordwood cutters would get around $3-4 a cord for each one that was used by the boats.  They would cut it and stack it next to the river at strategic points so that there was always an available supply along the routes that they traveled.  The sternwheelers could burn 1-3 cords and hour depending on the size of the boilers and how hard they ran the boat.  This was for upstream navigation only as downstream typically used a fraction of this as they used the current for most of their power.  Passengers were typically enlisted to help with the loading of the cordwood at the supply points. some boats could hold up to 10 cords of wood at one time.  It was one crew members job to continually feed the boilers with wood the entire time the boat was moving.

Ironically the Sternwheelers faded into obscurity in the 1912 -1920′s as the railway replaced the need for them.  The last use of the sternwheelers was the assisting with goods and supplies to build the railway.

On the Skeena River the last sternwheeler the “Inlander ” did its last trip in 1912. Why this is interesting is that there are still piles of old cordwood lying along the banks of the river that were never consumed.  In one location that we visit there are 6 piles lying adjacent to the river and they are in different stages of rot and decay but they can still be identified.  For some reason I find this fascinating that these piles are over 100 years old and are one of the only remnants of the historic Sternwheeler days.  If you want to visit these piles you can always join one of our tours that visits them or send me a note and I would be happy to provide you directions to them.

Checking out a pile of 100 year old cordwood
photo courtesy of @simonsees

 

100 year old Cordwood Pile
Sternwheeler with a load of cordwood on the front

 

 

 

The Port Essington Hi-Lo

One of the most photographed items on our visits to Port Essington is the abandoned boat lying in the deep sedge grass. I was fortunate enough to find out some more information on the boat and acquire a photo of the boat when it was seaworthy. The boats name is the Hi-Lo and it was a small crab fishing boat that plied the inner water of the coast in search of crabs. The lady who told me about it said that she remembers fishing on it it with her grandfather and rolling out a sleeping mat on top of the warm engine compartment at night time to go to sleep. The boat looks a little worse every year we go back there but still stands out prominently in the dark green sedge grass. We visit Port Essington on a few of our tours and we are doing a Brand New one day tour to Port Essington May 27, 2017. Don’t miss this opportunity to visit the town that still “Stands Guard over the Mouth of the Skeena”

The Hi-Lo at Port Essington
Hi-Lo boat

UNBC Adventure Tours Wildlife

On all of our Adventure tours the chances of seeing some sort of wildlife are almost guaranteed. The places we visit are remote and relatively untouched with few visitors. The bird life is amazing with so many species and a variety depending on where we are. There is always a chance to see a bear or moose and the odds go op greatly when we target the species. Here are just a few photos of some of the wildlife.

Coastal Wolf courtesy of Guest Bo
Western Tanager

 

Porpoise that frequent the lower Skeena/ ocean
Kingfisher with a fish in mouth courtesy of Guest Bo
Mergansers – Notice the fish in the mouth
Cormorants

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The Usk Bunny

We jet boat down the “River of Mists” or Skeena as it is better known on a few of our tours and at one of the spots near the tiny town of Usk we come around a corner and there lies a “Giant Bunny” Towering over the River. It takes many of the guests awhile to see this massive bunny but once seen it is always easy to spot again. The river provides a great vantage point to see the bunny. You can also spot the bunny in a few spots from the highway as well. Thanks @simonsees for the photo

Usk Bunny outline

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The Bolts of Ringbolt Island

One of the highlights on a couple of our tours is a jet boat ride through Kitselas Canyon. The narrow canyon restricts the flow of the Skeena River into two narrow channels. The narrowing made the canyon unnavigable for the Sternwheelers of the late 1800’s and early 1900’s. Their engines and paddles were not to propel them through the canyon during all but low water levels. This made the need for large steel bolts to be drill into the rock island in the middle of the canyon. The sternwheelers were then able to run a steel cable through the bolts and back to the capstan to winch the boat through. Ringbolt Island has the highest concentration of bolts but they are also lined all the way up the canyon. Every time we boat through the canyon we spot new ones. They blend in with the moss covered rocks and can be difficult to see. Be one of the few people to see this part of the Skeena River History and visit the Island during one of our adventure tours.

Ringbolt island Ring in Kitselas Canyon
Ring Bolt with Cable still attached
Bolts on RingBolt Island
Kitselas Canyon with Ringbolt Island on the left
Can you spot the ringbolt
Ring Bolt on Ringbolt Island
Kitselas Canyon Ringbolt

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Have You Ever Held A Waterfall?

The Skeena River is fed by thousands of waterfalls cascading down the mountain slopes  into it’s tributaries.  A couple of the rivers we venture up are untouched with no roads or industry and the steep valley walls are a perfect recipe for hundreds of waterfalls.  During the spring melt and after a rainfall the valley rocks walls become alive with waterfalls cascading in all directions.   With UNBC’s Adventure Tours “Experience the Extraordinary!”

Holding a waterfall
Holding Rooster Tail Falls
Hanging out at the Falls
Magnificent Waterfalls

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Running the Historic Kitselas Canyon


Taking a jet boat through the historic Kitselas Canyon is definitely one of the highlights of a couple of our tours where we run jet boat with our guests through the Canyon. The full force of the Skeena River is condensed into two narrow channels that were just wide enough for a sternwheeler to navigate through. It wasn’t until 1891 that the first Sternwheeler “Caledonia” was successful where others failed in running up and through the churning waters of the canyon. Running through the canyon is always an exhilarating ride but especially during high water in the spring when the full volume of water pours through. One of the most notable incidents in the canyon was the sinking of the Hudson’s Bay Company Sternwheeler the “Mount Royal”. It was July 6, 1907 when a blast of wind turned the boat sideways as it entered the upper canyon. This wind turned it sideways and wedged it sideways across Ringbolt Island where it eventually sank.

The Inlander navigating Kitselas Canyon

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UNBC Adventure Tours Jet Boat Safety

On our UNBC Adventure Tours guest safety is one of our main concerns. With many of our tours utilizing jet boats we must enure the drivers have a vast amount of experience driving jet boats and familiarity with the rivers and ocean that we take guests up. We many pre-trip inspections of the waters we venture into to ensure we do not incur any surprises. One of our drivers is Terrace resident Fred Seiler and owner of Northwest Jet Boat Services http://northwestjetboat.ca/.  Fred has thousands of hours of experience on the rivers and also instructs our UNBC Jet Boat Safety course.  Our guests are in good hands with Fred at the helm of the jet boat.

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