Free Five-Star Accommodations in Northern British Columbia

Northern British Columbia is well known for its accessible mountains, rivers, lakes and unlimited opportunities for adventure: It’s an outdoors person’s paradise! But did you know that the north also has some of the best free five-star accommodations anywhere? Next time you’re planning a backcountry adventure include a stay in one of these luxury cabins.

1. Morfee Mountain

This brand new backcountry cabin is located approximately 15 kilometers up the Morfee Mountain Forest Service Road, just outside Mackenzie, BC. Check out The Morfee Mountain Hop for more info.

 

2.  The “Old Trappers Cabin” 

It’s a tough ride into this almost all-inclusive cabin on Tabor Mountain. However, its well worth the effort. Its dry, has a cool wood stove and you get to spend some quality time with a family of mice and some squirrels. Apparently there are rainbow trout in the adjacent wetland. No outhouse included. Check out the Tabor Mountain Recreation Society for access and trail info.

3. The Troll Lake Cabin

This fantastic Tabor Mountain cabin has a great view of Troll Lake and is only a two kilometer ride or hike from Tower Road. While there is no outhouse or functioning wood stove, there is definitely a roof over your head and a door that closes. For access info download the  Tabor Mt. Recreation Society access map.

 

4. McBride Mountain Shelter

Windows and doors are not included in this mid-mountain shelter. However, the 180 degree view of Robson Valley view is second to none. Also included is an  outhouse, 50 meters down the road!  With a only a 7 kilometer ride, hike or drive up the unmaintained forest service road, you will want to add this chalet to your bucket list. For more info about McBride mountain click on McBride Mountain Madness.

5. McBride Mountain Fire Lookout

If the mid-mountain cabin is booked, then simply ride or hike another 8 kilometers to this alpine retreat. With windows, a door and a roof, what’s not to like about this retreat center?

6. Livingstone Springs Trapper’s Cabin

This heritage cabin is only a seven kilometer ride or hike from  Crooked River Provincial Park. With plenty of fresh water, squirrels and mice, you will want to book this accomadation asap.

7. Red (Grizzly Bear) Mountain Backcountry Cabin

All kidding aside, this is an all-inclusive subalpine cabin. Just bring your own food, clothes, and sleeping bag and you’re good-to-go. The cabin includes everything you need for a comfort-filled holiday; from a bbq to cookware, to plush foam mattresses. Grizzly bear, mule deer  and caribou frequent the area so you will have lots of company.  The outhouse has a  stellar view and there is fresh mountain spring water nearby. For more info or to book this cabin go to  the Prince George Backcountry Recreation Society.

8. Portage Mountain Trapper’s Cabin

Located approximately 20 kms west of Hudson’s Hope–near Portage Mountain–this streamlined cabin is apparently not open to the public. It’s nice to look at nonetheless.

9. Great West Life Mobility Park Cabin

This dilapidated yet rustic cabin is adjacent to the Prince George Snow Machine Club at the end of Scott Road. Watch out for the collapsing metal sheeting on the veranda and the broken glass inside. It will keep you dry in a pinch. Click here for more info about the Great West Life Mobility Park.

10. The Partially Completed Cranbrook Hill Cabin

This windowless, doorless and roofless cabin is only a short ride from UNBC. You will need a ladder and tarp if you’re spending the night in this unit.

Goat-River Gong Show & McBride Mnt. Madness

McBride Mnt., located approximately 2.5 hrs east of Prince George, is a tough climb but has some interesting alpine areas to explore as well as fantastic views of the Rocky Mnts. and Robson Valley. On the drive we decided to drop in at the Goat River historic trail for a bit of a warm up.

Dave and I geared up on a cool and cloudy Saturday afternoon

The Goat River Trail was first used by First Nations as a route between the Upper Fraser River and the Bowron Lakes area. CPR surveyors and miners kept this trail open during the mid to late-1800s. We accessed the trail at the parking lot adjacent to the outlet of the Milk River. However, it became clear that this trail was not MTB friendly.

The junction of the Milk and Goat River

Quartz CreekDave crushin it through dense thimbleberry, alder and cow parsnip

The trail was characterized by muddy, brush-covered single-track with large smooth slippery boulders and skinny’s over marshy, mucky sections. Dave bailed and later told me that he had bruised ribs from a soccer game:/ We pushed our bikes most of the time. After a couple of kms we decided to take a quick picture at the Goat River and head back. Note to self: this is a hiking trail only! Off to McBride Mnt.

While one could ride the full 12 km road to the start of the alpine, we decided to park at the 6 km cabin where we would spend the night.

The road up McBride Mnt. is hard packed sand and gravel, with many sections of loose gravels and stones with exposed angular bed rock. It is also steep, running minimum 7% and some times up to 15% slope.

Typical steep switch back

The views improve as you ascend the mountain

It was raining in the Robson Valley as we road out of the subalpine

At 12 km, we began a tough 2 km push into the alpine. The summit of McBride Mnt. was in the clouds.

Looking west at an alpine ridge

Made it to the rebuilt fire lookout

The weather began to turn as we reached the fire lookout. The temperature dropped to about 5 degrees C  and the wind picked up. We decided to head back to the cabin. It snowed in the alpine later that weekend. Needless to say the 8 km downhill ride was fast and bumpy-my hands were aching by the time we reached the cabin.

This is one of the best, easily accessed campsites that I have every been to. Check out the views…

Looking south into the Rockies

Sweet and spicy peanut sauce on rice noodles with pepperoni. A bikepacking standard for me.

Getting out of the rain

While Dave and I were setting up camp, two guys rolled in on road bikes. Meet John and Brad: two Californians who came to BC to ride all of its toughest mountain peaks (25 I think). They are part of a cycling community called Pjammcycling. They had no idea that the road up McBride Mnt. was unpaved-but they road it anyways. We had a chat, shared some dinner  and wished them well. These guys are hard core!

McBride Mnt. is a tough ride, but provides awesome access to the alpine and great camping. For more info check out:

McBride Peak Info

Pjammacycling