Front-Country Fatbiking in Jasper, Alberta

Scenic single-track, stunning views, wildlife and epic cross-country rides are just minutes away from downtown Jasper, Alberta. Even better: these trails are virtually empty in the late fall!  Three of my favorite trails include Pyramid to Katrine Lake, the Athabasca River trail (west and east) and the Valley of the Five Lakes network.  Check them out this fall or winter–you won’t be disappointed.

Valley of the Five Lakes Trailhead
Some double-track on the east side of the Athabasca river between Beauvert Lake and the northern most bridge
Single-track winding through pine grass and aspen
A Douglas fir stand near Pyramid lake
A stunning view of Jasper and the Athabasca river valley
Pyramid Mountain and lake
Looking north down the Athabasca river just adjacent to the Maligne river

The “googley-eyed” bear
A bighorn sheep grazing near the Valley of the Five Lakes trail

The view from the  Bear Paw Cafe in downtown Jasper

For more info about front-country mountain biking in Jasper National Park go to Jasper Travel. You will definitely want a map when exploring this huge network of trails. Download this map produced by Parks Canada. Remember: tell someone where your going, dress for the weather and always bring survival gear.



The Morfee Mountain Hop

Looking for some alpine adventure with killer views and mountaintop accommodations? Then check out Morfee Mountain. Only two hours north of Prince George, this 5800 foot peak is easily accessed by mountain bike, off-road vehicle  or snow machine. With great views of the Rocky Mountains, Williston Lake and Mackenzie, British Columbia, you will definitely want to add this mountain to your bucket list.

The old snow machine club cabin at the Morfee Mt. staging/parking lot.

Access to this area is via Morfee Mt. Forest Service Road, only a few kms north of the community of Mackenzie off of Highway 39. There is a large gravel lot just off the road near the old blue cabin. You can park and ride from here or drive 15 kms to the subalpine cabin, and start from there. You can also drive all the way to the summit, park and explore the ridge lines.

Adventure mountain bikers and bikepackers will love the 17 km ascent that gains 3400 feet in elevation. This sandy, maintained road winds gradually upslope and has both flat and steep sections, especially in the alpine.

The Morfee Creek Crossing

The living wall
Looking southeast towards a rocky ridge line.

The Morfee Mt. cabin recently built for the local snowmachine club

There are ample places to set up camp  in the subalpine (approx. 4000 ft.) However, there is a brand new public cabin nearby that may be a better choice on a cold/wet day. This cabin also has a descent pit toilet and fantastic views of the rocky ridges and pristine forests to the east. If your’e lucky you might see some Southern Mountain Woodland Caribou.

Looking east from the cabiin
A great crop of blueberries
Looking south towards Mackenzie, BC and Williston Lake.
This ridge line runs northeast from Morfee Mt. and could be northern BC’s next epic ride
Morfee Mt. summit.
Looking north towards the Hart Range (Rocky Mts.)

Once on top, you can ride or hike the shale ridges running north and southwest. The wind blows hard at the top so remember to pack some warm clothing. For more info about Morfee Mountain check out Dougz’s ClubTread Post.

Mountain Biking North Nechako-Miworth


The iconic “cut banks” at the end of North Nechako road is your gateway to outdoor adventure. With miles of  roads and  trails, wildlife, scenic springs and ranches, and  a fascinating history, the North Nechako-Miworth area is an ideal Ride the Wild location!

You can start your adventure at two places;  the end of North Nechako road or from the McPhee/Chief Lake road junction. Once you pass the cut banks, North Nechako  becomes the Takla Forest Service Road, which heads north west, upslope, to McPhee  then north to Chief Lake road. A spur road runs south of Takla, just above the river, providing several access point to the Nechako river for the more adventurous (or those who like bush wacking).

Looking west down the cut banks


There is some great winter riding in this area.  Takla road is plowed up to the junction of the second access road on the left. Some  members of the Lheidli T’enneh First Nation  live on-site at Clesbaoneecheck or Fort George Indian Reserve # 3. The Nechako river valley, as well as all of Prince George, lies within the traditional area of this First Nation. Please respect the land and those that live on it.

Some swans on Duck LAke


Local First Nations hunted for caribou, ducks and geese, as well as trapped and fished in this area. Indeed, as late as the 1900s there was a camp at Duck Lake where Lheidli T’enneh hunters lived. During the summer, Chief Louis also kept his horses here, so that they could graze on the grasses that covered the floodplain alongside of the river.

In the early 20th century,  settlers built a reaction ferry that could transport people across the river.  People could take the train from Prince George to Miworth (on the east side of the river) and for a few cents take  the ferry across. A reaction ferry consisted of two large connected pontoons that were attached to a cable system running from one side of the river to the other. The remains of this ferry can still be seen on the west shore of the big bend of the Nechako, opposite Wilkins Park.

Looking down McPhee Road


One of the ranches on McPhee Road


Looking east towards the bench land above the Nechako river valley


Some fallow pasture


McPhee creek is a small fish-bearing stream that descends to the Nechako river.  Just upstream of the second bridge are a series of springs. The warmer spring water prevents the river from freezing over during the winter.

Winter on the McPhee

McPhee creek crossing # 2


This area is rich in diversity. Eagles, kingfishers, ducks, swans, herons, moose, deer, bear (grizzly and black) and wolves all  inhabit the river valley and rich riparian areas. There is some great eagle viewing in the cottonwood trees just before and after the cut banks.

A winter wolf kill

This campsite provides great access to the Nechako river. First Nations and other locals often fish the Stuart River sockeye run at this spot. You can get to this camp by taking the spur road that runs south of Takla road, across the creek, then down the second trail on your left. This steep, short trail ends right at the river. Use flies or lures, casting from shore into the deep pools: you may catch a resident rainbow trout.

Are you interested in kicking your outdoor adventure up, a few notches? Then check out the University of Northern British Columbia’s Northern BC Adventures. From ghost towns to grizzly bears, these educational adventures get you into some of the most inaccessible places in northwest BC.