7 Favorite Forests and Trees

Trees and forests are iconic. From the Haida First Nation’s “Golden Spruce,” to the Druid’s “Sacred Oak” to 19th century Vancouver’s “Carey Fir,” trees have played a significant role in the material and cultural lives of people for millennia. As a former forestry consultant and all-around forest dweller, trees have played a significant role in my life standing as witness’s to my past, present and future. Think of a what a 300 year Douglas fir has seen, let alone a 1000 year old western red cedar? Enjoy some of my favorite trees. Perhaps you know where they are? These awesome organisms need no explanation.

If you would like to know how you can experience these trees yourself,  send me an email.

7 Reasons to Winter Ride

Cold, blue-steel skies. The rhythmic sound of the drive train.  The soft crunch of tires on -20 Celsius snow.  Winter fatbiking can be an intense visual and tactile experience. More than that, you can access places that you just can’t get to during the summer and fall. Frozen lakes, wetlands and shorelines are just some of the cool features of winter riding in northern British Columbia. Get your boots and gloves on and lets ride.

Riding the perimeter of a frozen lake is a fantastic way of seeing something familiar but from a different perspective. Shoreline vegetation is dormant, naked and brittle brown. The deep is covered by a crunchy blanket of white. The lake seems less mysterious and more one dimensional. If you pick a remote lake, you will see no one: it can be quite eerie.

Animals are much easier to locate and track in the winter. Moose, red fox, coyotes, wolves and other species stand out against the frozen landscape. These bizarre tracks crossed the lake for a hundred meters then disappeared into an alder-choked wetland.

Forests look different in the winter. This stand of snow-pressed balsam fir and spruce collapsed over the trail taunting me to, “run the gauntlet.” I made it through unscathed. Mature conifers regularly fall down across the trail. No one, as far as I know, has ever been crushed on these trails.

Snow covered single track becomes smooth and flowy, once the roots, rocks and depressions are covered and packed down. There is very little snow this year, and these trails still rattle your cage.

Winter riding takes more effort and calories, especially on a fatbike with five inch tires. My legs burned during my first winter.

Winter is a relief from the always present bruin. If you live in grizzly and black bear country, you get to put away your bear spray after November. Oh yeah, the bugs are gone as well.

Building a fire, making hot coffee and starring at the embers is a great reward on a cold day. Humans have been doing this for millennia. The communal fire is where stories were told, wisdom shared and identity created: fire is primal. Take some time from your hectic, high-tech life to do this.

Winter riding can be intensely cold but also visually stunning. Frozen fingers and toes are offset by access to new areas, sights, sounds and  experiences. In the next couple of month looks for posts on how to stay warm while winter riding as well as essential gear for Riding the Wild!

Tsus Lakes Day Trip

The Tsus Lakes are a tiny lake chain in the heart of the northern Caribou mountains. Nestled between Spring mountain’s three peaks and an unnamed pyramid-shaped mountain to the south, this  valley has some fantastic views and is  an  easy 25 km ride from the parking area.  The Tsus Lakes are perfect for the adventure mountain biker or bikepacker.

The Tsus Lakes valley is west of the Bowron river and only 62 km east of Prince George. Turn on the Cutoff Road Forest Service Road on the south side of the highway just before the Bowron River bridge. You can either park by the highway pullout or a few kilometers down the road at the Coalmine Forest Service Road junction.

Matt and I picked a cool and sunny fall day to explore this area. The Coalmine FSR runs east towards the Bowron river, then south. The first dozen kilometers are characterized by a rolling plateau through stands of young lodgepole pine, aspen and some spruce. We found some cool sand dunes on the east side of the road, not far from where we parked. Matt was thrilled to ride his brand new fatbike on these dunes. A lone wolf liked the dunes as well!

An interesting mountain peak in the Bowron river valley.

Looking west towards Spring mountain. There is a great campsite at this un-named lake.Some snow-capped mountains off in the distance. The access road to the Tsus Lakes valley is a deactivated road that branches off of the Coalmine FSR. This is a rarely used road that narrows to ATV width. All the culverts and bridges have been removed which  makes for some fun stream crossings.

A narrow track winds through the trees down to the campsite on northern most lake. There are some great views of the tree clad mountains to the west. It is unusual to see un-logged terrain anywhere in the Prince George region. There is a great campsite beside the lake as well.

As you ride west along the lake chain, you begin to gain elevation. The toe slope on the east side has transitional welt-belt ecosystems with mature western red cedar,  hemlock and a thick moss-covered forest floor.

As you approach the last lake,  the trail becomes crowded with alder saplings. Be sure to wear eye and hand protection.

The sun was behind us on the ride home. I’m always smiling when riding.

With picturesque lakes, forest-clad slopes and snow-covered mountain peaks, the Tsus Lakes area is fantastic for day-tripping  or overnight bike camping. Be sure to use Google Earth for route planning and carry a SPOT GPS Device when riding.
If your interested in some stellar riding in the Rocky Mountains then go to Three Must Explore Mountain Towns on Flightnetwork.com’s travel blog.
You can learn about blogging or publishing your adventures, at UNBC’s upcoming Outdoor Adventure Writing and Blogging Workshop at our Prince George campus. Taught by veteran adventurer Vivien Lougheed, this class and field-based workshop will help you take transform your outdoor experiences and photos into a compelling written narrative.

Three Days Riding in the Rockies

This October I took a road trip to Canmore, Alberta to participate in the first ever “Bike Pack Summit,” a conference that focused on adventuring riding or mountain bike touring (multi-day trips on a mtb). I drove and rode some of the most spectacular scenery that western Canada has to offer including Mcbride, BC,  Jasper National Park, the Columbia ice fields, Banff National Park and Canmore. Join me while we Ride the Wild!

A beam of light passes over my bike during an early morning sunrise stop at McBride’s Beanery 2 Bistro.

During World War 2, this glacier was only a few hundred meters from the parking area on Highway 93 South.

Crushed by a glacier and beaten down by the wind, these moraines consist of hard packed, frozen sand and gravel.  You can easily ride along the wind packed peaks.

Looking at the terminal moraine. The glacier is just beyond this point.

In Canmore, bike shops serve coffee (sell the farm honey were moving to Canmore). Meet Adam Zeddy a mountain bike and coffee sales guy at Bicycle Cafe CanmoreHe served me an awesome double Americano that was smooth, full bodied and had a caramel finish. Needles to say, I had coffee there every day!

The Canmore Bikepack Summit was hosted by Rebound Cycle. We gathered in a big tent beside the bike shop for talks and refreshments, each day.

This gathering of adventure nuts, long distance racers, back country riders and expedition junkies was colegial, informative and fun. We had sessions about bike break downs, nutrition, long distance routes, gear,  riding with kids and the always contentious issue of trail access. The group rides…well check out the photos they tell it all.

The view from Rebound Cycle.

Crossing the Bow River while riding the Legacy Trail.

A Group ride traffic jam.

When I smile like this I’m really happy!

The Three Sisters mountains and a Fatbike.

I pushed my bike up this section for approx. 1 km before realizing that I was on the wrong trail. Needless to say, I never caught up with the group ride.

I thought this washout would be a great shortcut back to the valley bottom.

Between a rock and a great place!

If your interested in learning more about multi-day mountain bike trips into the backcountry then attend next years Canmore Bikepack Summit. Go to their Facebook page for more info.

British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley also has some great trails to explore. Browse Four to Explore Trails in the Okanagan on Flightnetwork.com’s travel blog and plan your next adventure to this hot and dry part of the province.

 

16 Favorite Photos from Riding the Wild in Northern BC

Winter is right around the corner and now I am preparing for a several  winter  Ride the Wild adventures. Here are some of my favorite  photos from this last year. Enjoy!

The Fraser River at low water
These guys should have been riding fatbikes instead of a fatcat SUV!

The Buckhorn area, southeast of Prince George, has some great views of the Caribou Mountain Range to the east.

Need I say more?

The Bear Lake area, north or Prince George, has some great sand riding. This area was the northern shoreline of a glacial lake that once covered the central interior following the big  melt during the late Pleistocene.

Jasper National Park has tonnes of trails and great views.

Did I say Northern BC? Sorry, this kitsch shot is from Audra Petersen’s rental cabin in the Tatlayoko Valley, southwest of Williams Lake.

Tatlayoko Lake

Light at the end of the tunnel

 The slopes east and west of Okanagan Lake, in  Kelowna, provide some fantastic and interesting views.

The Chub Lake area, just south of Prince George, has some great country riding through pastures and aspen stands. You may even run into other kinds of riders.

The Beatton River Valley, east of Fort St. John, has some big visuals if your willing to push your bike up a %45 slope for a kilometer or more.

My  bike was impounded recently and I was charged with “having too much fun” at Heart Lake Provincial Park in the heart of the Rockies.

A “green-dot” Sunset over Charlie Lake

Tatlayoko Lake: A South Chilcotin Paradise

Grey craggy peaks, forest clad slopes and a crystal clear lake paved with cobblestones awaits you in the Chilcotin. If you’re a bikepacker or adventure rider who likes rustic rental cabins and old fashioned western hospitality, then Tatlayoko Lake should be your next weekend getaway.

This glacier-fed lake lies between the coast mountain’s “Niut Range” and the interior’s  “Potatoe Range,” three hours southwest of William’s Lake. Tatlayoko Valley is south facing  and covered with Douglas fir, pine, trembling aspen and grassy meadows filled with lazy cattle. This is a ranching community with approximately 75 mailboxes, but many go unused. The lake is also a hot windsurfing destination.

We rented a rustic loft from Audra Peterson, a local school teacher and former ecologist. Audra and her partner Don live off of home-grown veggies and wild game. They are healthy, wonderful people.

Every morning a friendly mountain horse and an intense sunrise to the west greeted us. Coffee and oatmeal never tasted so good.

Rustic outbuildings with snowshoes, antlers and skulls dotted the ranch. All the major apex predators such as black and grizzly bear as well as wolves inhabit this area. Old logging roads provide access to the slopes on both sides of the valley and lake. The lake is any easy seven kilometer ride from the cabin. If you continue riding south down Tatlayoko road you will find some great Forest Service Recreation sites as well as a community picnic area with outhouses, beach access and even a ball diamond (only used by deer at this point).

 

 

The north and east shores of the lake are perfect for exploration on a fatbike or any mountain bike with 3 inch or bigger tires. We found deer and bear tracks along the shore. The meadows and wetlands to the north of the lake are a critical Grizzly bear corridor.

Range fences seem to run forever down the valley.

The entire west side of the lake is a Nature Conservancy conservation zone that is jointly managed for ranching and biodiversity values.

I am definitely revisiting this area next summer for a 3 day bikepack traverse around the lake. I can’t wait to sleep on the beach! For more info about this area check out:

Tatlayoko Ranch Nature Conservancy

Camping and Recreation Sites

Audra’s Cabin Rental-Air B&B

War Falls to Carp Lake Provincial Park

This stunning waterfall is only a 2.5 hour drive northwest of Prince George. With roadside parking, a smooth 1 km single-track through a spruce and fir forest and accessible swimming, War Falls on the McLeod River may be the best waterfall in the region. If you add a 10 km ride to Carp Lake, you have a great summer day trip for the adventure mountain biker!

From Prince George, drive approximately 2 hours north on the Yellowhead Highway and follow the signs west into the First Nations community of McLeod Lake. Cross the bridge, drive past the large gas bar and continue west on Carp Lake road. For the first few km’s, the well-maintained gravel road runs through a logged area, then narrows and winds through the timber until the trail head at the 23 km mark. This narrow section is quite scenic.

Single-track trail heading down into the river valleyFirst set of falls

Second set of falls

The last set of falls can be observed from a small platform with access to a rocky beach

Looking downstream to the northeast

We met Luke and Nicole at the falls. They walked into the falls with their clothes and boots on and swam around for quite a while. We spent several hours swimming in the falls and exploring the riparian area, downstream. Carp Lake Provincial Park is an easy ride approximately 10 km west of the falls. War Lake is half-way between the falls and Carp Lake. It has a nice beach and camping area.

My typical speed on my Specialized Fatboy fatbike

Carp Lake is a wilderness lake, with only one access. There are campsites, up on a bench, along the eastern edge of the lake. Small trails descend 50 or so meters to docks along the lake. There are also campsites that you can boat to.

Chillin on the dockDwarf Blueberries alongside the road

Fore more information about War Falls and Carp Lake Provincial Park go to:

Carp Lake & War Falls

Nuxalk-Carrier Grease Trail Day Trip

No, the Nuxalk-Carrier Grease Trail is not a slick, clayey brake clogging trail, but rather one that runs from the Fraser River, south of Prince George, to Bella Coola, west of the coast mountains. The grease is “Oolichan oil,” or the oil extracted by First Nations from a tiny ocean fish called the Oolichan (candle fish). This precious commodity was traded between coastal and interior First Nations via. an extensive trail network. Alexander Mackenzie utilized this trail (after being guided by local First Nations) on his famous expedition to the Pacific in the 1770s. Hence the trails secondary name: the Alexander Mackenzie Trail.

I accessed the trail at the 107 km on the Batnuni Forest Service Road. This single-track and ATV trail winds through some beautiful country and makes a fantastic day trip for the adventure rider.

This trail begins on a narrow bench of pine and spruce, paralleling the road,  then quickly descends into a lowland with a series of wetlands of varying size, just north of Cotsworth Lake. Almost immediately you have to cross a slow moving creek-so be prepared to get wet.

Creek crossing # 1.

After the first crossing, the trail runs along a small ridge that skirts most of the wetlands. The grass covered trail and white trembling aspens contrast sharply against the blue sky and grey waters.

Eventually, you have to cross another creek, this one was thigh deep and running a lot faster. Check out the video of my dangerous river crossing!

 Getting Wet

This unnamed lake has a great campsite.

 Unless you want to join Alice in Wonderland, I don’t recommend eating the Panther amanitas growing alongside the trail

Yarrow grows alongside the trail. At approximately 6 kms the trail crosses another channel between two wetlands, just south of the east end of Titetown Lake. While only two feet deep, this crossing is about 60 meters wide!

Scattered alongside of the trail are many trees with old blazes on them. Called Culturally Modified Trees (CMT) by Archaeologists, some of these trees were scarred by local First Nations (Nazko) to mark the location of a trail or to harvest cambium (inner bark), an important source of carbohydrates. Some are so old that they have completely healed over.

Time to dry out the shorts.

You can ride the Nuxalk-Carrier Grease trail aprroximately 20 km to Kluskoil Lake, and farther,  or take the ATV track the ascends onto a ridge that runs along the east side of Titetown Lake. This part of the trail affords some great views of the lake and the Nechako plateau as well as the tiny community that lives nearby.

Titetown Lake community.

An ever present reminder that bikes will outlive cars!

The Nuxalk-Carrier Grease Trail is a smooth relaxing ride through some beautiful wetland and lake country only a couple hours south of Prince George. It has numerous campsites, good access and is rarely used. For more info about this trail go to..

Grease Trail

Alexander Mackenzie Trail

Willow River Bikepack

The Willow River Canyon area, just east of Prince George, is a fantastic bikepacking destination, perfect for a weekend adventure. Join us as we ride the Tabor Mt. trails east to the canyon and then down into the Willow River.

The Tabor Mt. Recreation Area is 25 km’s east of Prince George and is bounded by Hwy. 16 to the north, Buckhorn Rd. to the south and the Willow River, to the east. You can access this well maintained trail network at Tabor Mt. Ski Hill. Kyrke and I began our trip at the ski hill access, where we geared up and road up onto the West Touring trail. This trail runs along the toe-slope of Tabor Mt. to the X-Country ski area parking lot. This ATV width trail is characterized by rolling terrain with short uphill sections: perfect for a fatbike with 40 lbs of gear.

Kyrke getting his gear organized.

A typical section of trail.

This area receives lots of  rainwater  runoff and seepage from numerous upslope springs, therefore, it is lush and jungle like. Cow parsnip, black twinberry, raspberry, Goat’s beard and some Devil’s club (watch out) crowd the trail–making the ride an intense visual and olfactory experience. These sections are my favorite.

A meadow with Cow parsnip and Ox-eyed daisy’s.

The West Touring trail runs for 2 km until the x-country ski area parking lot. We continued east along the Hickory Wing Trail then followed the East Touring Trail, over Bowes Creek, then upslope along the Martin Trail.

 Bowes Creek bridge.

The Martin Trail and Willow River Canyon Trail junction.

At this point we had to backtrack because the Willow River Canyon Trail was covered with blown-down timber. We took a side access trail (Martin Trail connector) that ran north to Hwy. 16. We then followed Hwy. 16 east until England Creek Forest Service Road. A couple hundred meters down this road is the England Creek bridge. A single-track trail on the north side of the bridge runs east to the Willow River. At the junction of England Creek and the Willow is a great campsite that gives you access to the shore.

 Looking south down the Willow River Canyon from the England Creek campsite.

A small waterfall on the England.

From here simply rode back to the Hwy. and then east for a few km’s until the Willow North Forest Service road. This road will take you to several access points along the Willow.

This large camping area provides hundred of meters of riverfront access and is suitable for tents and hammocks. There is plenty of dead fall, so firewood is available. One way to reduce weight while bikepacking is to not carry a stove. I cook all my meals over a fire.

Collecting firewood by bike.

There is nothing better than chiliin out with a cold beer in BC’s wilderness!

 

Sunset over the Willow.

 We rode the full 48 km’s back to Prince George. This is a relatively easy ride and the westbound shoulder is wide enough that one feels safe. One interesting stop along the way is the Tabor Mt. Wildlife Viewing platform. This area is on the north side of the road, adjacent the Martin Trail connector. Accessed by a 200 meter single-track trail that runs through a young stand of aspen, spruce and fir, this viewing platform provides some nice visual corridors of Tabor Mt.

 

Looking southwest towards Tabor Mt.

Tabor Mt. and the Willow River Canyon are a great accessible adventure biking area, that are close to town. They are ideal if you just getting into bikepacking or want a  a relatively easy weekend trip. Please note that there are grizzly and black bears in this area as well as cougar and wolves. My best advice would be to make lots of noise and carry bear spray. Also, let people know where you will be going and carry a SPOT GPS device. For more info on this area check out:

Tabor Mt. Recreation Society

Check out some of the other fantastic rivers in this area at my FlightNetwork blog post The 3 Best Rivers in Northern BC to See

Big Wheels-Big Sky: Cariboo-Chilcotin by Fat Bike

Northern BC has great riding, but sometimes you have to head south to ride  dry, dusty trails and experience the wide-open “big sky country” vistas. Last weekend I spent three days exploring the Cariboo-Chilcotin’s trails and back country and I wasn’t disappointed. My riding began in 108 Mile House and ended near Junction Sheep Provincial Park on the Chilcotin Plateau. Check out my ride!

108 Mile House Trail Network

This ominous looking tunnel is the entrance way to  a huge network of single/double track, ATV and road-width trails at the 108 Mile House historic site, on the east side of  Hwy. 97. The trail heads east towards Sucker Lake through rolling grassy meadows, with patches of aspen and Douglas fir. There are some short uphill sections on the east side of the lake and plenty of grassy range land to explore.

Typical single-track and x-country ski trails.

You can spend hours riding and exploring the small ridges that run north-south throughout the range land. I did a 20 km loop around Sucker Lake.

Sucker Lake.

Chasm Provincial Park

If you had shown me this picture two weeks ago, I wouldn’t have believed that it was in BC! Chasm Provincial Park, south of 100 Mile House, is  a 3000  hectare valley and plateau that was carved out of a massive lava flow, by water,10 million years ago. Ponderosa pine and Douglas fir cover the rocky crags that are home to big horn sheep and mule deer.

An ATV width-trail runs along the south rim of the park then loops around through grassy Douglas fir and ponderosa pine stands. You get a great view of the canyon for almost 5 kms of trail. If you are brave enough to walk to the edge you can see where the sheep walked up the cliff onto the rim. The sheep come to feed on the pinegrass that grows beneath the trees.

 

A partial skull and vertebrae of a Bighorn sheep.

Lots of interesting old buildings and equipment litter the Cariboo landscape.

Bonaparte River Area

The Bonaparte River lies to the north of Chasm and has a fantastic rec site where I spent the night. The beer and spicy-peanut sauce on rice noodles was fantastic.

Junction Sheep Range Provincial Park Area

This park overlooks the junction of the Fraser and Chilcotin river and is only a 35 minute drive from Williams Lake. Bordered by a working cattle ranch, this plateau gently slopes to the south and is covered by lush grasslands and stands of Douglas fir and aspen.

In the background is the road to Bella Coola and in the foreground is a kick ass ridge top single track that runs for kilometers to the valley bottom.

The viewscapes are stunning and non-stop. Looking east.

Looking South.

Looking towards the park. Prickly pear cactus grows along the edge of the trail on south facing slopes–so watch your tires and shoes.

Heart-leaved arnica grows in grassy meadows underneath the fir trees.

If your lucky you may see a mountain bluebird on a high perch!

Allow yourself a full day to ride this area. Also note that the land adjacent to the access road is private and no-go. Riders are not the only users: there was a group pf backcountry horse packers there as well. Interesting comparison between hoof impacts and fat tires….

The scenery, riding, and ecosystems of BC’s Cariboo-Chilcotin area are second to none. At the end of a hard hot day of riding you can also enjoy the sunsets.

Riding History in Northern BC: The Alexander Mackenzie Trail

On Sunday, I was fortunate enough to ride the Alexander Mackenzie trail with Scott, Phil and Dean: three outstanding riders (I saw them for about 3 minutes over a 30 km stretch). This trail, called the Nuxalk-Carrier Grease trail by local First Nations, was a  super-highway running West through the Interior Plateau and Coast Mts. that allowed Interior and Coastal First Nations to trade items such as Oolichan oil and obsidian. In fact, this trail network and First Nations guides were critical to Alexander Mackenzie’s 1793 expedition to the  Pacific. Natives, from a village near the junction of the Blackwater and Fraser rivers, guided Mackenzie west along the river, then south into the Nazko area.

The Alex Mack trail is a 30 km in-out ride characterized by flowy, rolling single track with short steep uphill sections. Its ideal for all-mountain bikes and hardtails, however, fat-bikes works too!

This single-track trail heads West along a bench through stands of Douglas fir, birch and aspen. The South-facing slopes are covering with cured pine grass, juniper and some very large fir veterans. At the 36 km mark (36 km from the Fraser), the trails crosses another historic trail: the Collins Overland Telegraph trail. Surveyed and built in 1865 by the Western Union Telegraph Company, the Collins telegraph line would ambitiously link the United States and Russia. However, the project was abandoned not long after it was started.

There are some great views looking south. The short downhill sections are non-technical and quick, but you have to watch out for the trees…

Watch Downhill Video

Thanks to the efforts of local riders, this trail is kept open, however, there are still a couple of sections where massive firs have blown down. With a little effort even a heavy fat bike can make it over!

For more info on this trail check out:

Alexander Mackenzie Trail Info

 

Exploring Northern BC by Bike

On the long weekend, I spent a couple of days exploring the back roads and trails in the Opatcho Lake area, just south of Prince George. In the early 1960s, a massive fire called the Tsus or Groveburn fire burned thousands of hectares in this area and Northeast to Tabor Mnt. Firefighting, salvage logging and reforestation efforts resulted in a patchwork of openings and roads. In recent years, local hiking, ATV and snowmobile clubs have maintained a network of awesome doubletrack trails and access roads.

While there was little snow on the main access road, Francis Lake was still frozen.

 

My plan was to ride the Francis Lake Trail for 8 km, then find a camp spot along the river, however, the snow was too deep and soft. In this case, I backtracked and rode Buckhorn road to Opatcho road, then up  to the lake.

St. Marys Lake.

I had the campsite at Opatcho Lake all to myself. However, because of a cold wind coming off of the lake, I built my camp a 100 meters away in the timber.

 

After cutting a good supply of firewood, I had a late lunch. There is no shortage of firewood in this area and a camp stove is not necessary–this is a great way to save weight when bike packing. A good handsaw is critical however.

If you ride south along Apatcho road, you can get some great views looking east  towards the Caribou Mnt. range.

That evening I watched the sunset.The temperature dropped rapidly and the overnight lows were around -4 c. The atmosphere was crystal clear and the stars, stunning! Sometime after midnight I was woken by coyote howls, followed by wolves. Great Horned and Screech owls also added to the night time symphony.

Given my research interests in Forest History I had to check out this old mill site were they processed much of the salvaged timber. Given that this site is covered with bits of metal and broken glass, my spidey senses warned me not to ride into into it: I should have listened, by the next morning I had a flat:(

Other than two trucks and an ATV that drove into the campsite, I did not see anyone else in the bush. This is typical of Northern BC. If you would like an opportunity to explore this part of the world check out UNBC’s Educational Adventure programs running this spring and summer: Educational Adventures

Interested in some northern BC adventure? Then book your flights, hotel and rental cars from FlighNetwork.com.

Go to http://www.flightnetwork.com/flights/ for more info.