Tabor Mountain’s Trapper’s Shack

“8 trout-good fishing, also replaced stove pipe with larger ones 5”. No more smoke in cabin,” wrote Willie Kwiatkowski on December 28, 1977 in a tattered spiral-ring journal.”

This 39 year old journal can be found  in the cobweb covered rafters of an old backcountry cabin south of the Tabor Mountain fire tower, near the headwaters of Bowes creek. Called the “Old Trapper’s Shack,” this cabin is just one of the fantastic cultural features found in the Tabor Mountain Recreation Area , just fifteen  minutes east of Prince George. If your’e looking for some summer or winter adventure then this area is a must see!


Tabor Mountain Recreation Area Trail Map

You can access this historic cabin by mountain bike, walking, skis or ATV. Park at the junction of Giscome and Groveburn road, heading south to the junction of the Tower and VOR Forest Service Road. Its all uphill from here. Follow the VOR road east, until you reach the first switchback, where you can see the fire tower to the north. Take the narrow Frost Lake Multiuse Trail for about 1.8 kms, then head south down a narrow trail. This descent is heavily rutted and brushy. The trail eventually flattens out in treed wetland. The narrow trapper’s trail is covered with knee high grass, horsetail, balsam fir and spruce. Follow this trail, north along the edge of the wetland until you see the cabin.

You will have to cross a  makeshift bridge over  the creek that feeds the wetland. Proceed with caution.

This cabin is dry and drafty with a functioning wood stove. However, there is a a lot of mouse and squirrel waste, so I would not recommend sleeping in the cabin unless it is thoroughly swept out.

The old claw-foot stove.

While trapping may seem distasteful to some, it was a source of revenue for First Nations and immigrants during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Indeed, there is a small handful of people that still trap this region today.

The spiral-ringed journal from the 1970s found in the rafters.
Another Journals from the 1980s.

The wetland adjacent to the cabin.

Cultural features such as this trapper’s cabin are an important source of data on Tabor Mountain’s environmental history. I find it interesting that there were trout–or perhaps there still are–in this wetland, begging the question: how did they get there?

With hundreds of kilometers of multi-use trails, the Tabor Mountain Recreation Area is an outdoor adventure person’s paradise. For more info about riding this area, check out my other posts, Fatbiking Tabor Mountain and Tabor Mountain Recreation Area: Prince George’s Best Kept Mountain Biking Secret.

Mountain Biking North Nechako-Miworth

 

The iconic “cut banks” at the end of North Nechako road is your gateway to outdoor adventure. With miles of  roads and  trails, wildlife, scenic springs and ranches, and  a fascinating history, the North Nechako-Miworth area is an ideal Ride the Wild location!

You can start your adventure at two places;  the end of North Nechako road or from the McPhee/Chief Lake road junction. Once you pass the cut banks, North Nechako  becomes the Takla Forest Service Road, which heads north west, upslope, to McPhee  then north to Chief Lake road. A spur road runs south of Takla, just above the river, providing several access point to the Nechako river for the more adventurous (or those who like bush wacking).

Looking west down the cut banks

 

There is some great winter riding in this area.  Takla road is plowed up to the junction of the second access road on the left. Some  members of the Lheidli T’enneh First Nation  live on-site at Clesbaoneecheck or Fort George Indian Reserve # 3. The Nechako river valley, as well as all of Prince George, lies within the traditional area of this First Nation. Please respect the land and those that live on it.

Some swans on Duck LAke

 

Local First Nations hunted for caribou, ducks and geese, as well as trapped and fished in this area. Indeed, as late as the 1900s there was a camp at Duck Lake where Lheidli T’enneh hunters lived. During the summer, Chief Louis also kept his horses here, so that they could graze on the grasses that covered the floodplain alongside of the river.

In the early 20th century,  settlers built a reaction ferry that could transport people across the river.  People could take the train from Prince George to Miworth (on the east side of the river) and for a few cents take  the ferry across. A reaction ferry consisted of two large connected pontoons that were attached to a cable system running from one side of the river to the other. The remains of this ferry can still be seen on the west shore of the big bend of the Nechako, opposite Wilkins Park.

Looking down McPhee Road

 

One of the ranches on McPhee Road

 

Looking east towards the bench land above the Nechako river valley

 

Some fallow pasture

 

McPhee creek is a small fish-bearing stream that descends to the Nechako river.  Just upstream of the second bridge are a series of springs. The warmer spring water prevents the river from freezing over during the winter.

Winter on the McPhee

McPhee creek crossing # 2

 

This area is rich in diversity. Eagles, kingfishers, ducks, swans, herons, moose, deer, bear (grizzly and black) and wolves all  inhabit the river valley and rich riparian areas. There is some great eagle viewing in the cottonwood trees just before and after the cut banks.

A winter wolf kill

This campsite provides great access to the Nechako river. First Nations and other locals often fish the Stuart River sockeye run at this spot. You can get to this camp by taking the spur road that runs south of Takla road, across the creek, then down the second trail on your left. This steep, short trail ends right at the river. Use flies or lures, casting from shore into the deep pools: you may catch a resident rainbow trout.

Are you interested in kicking your outdoor adventure up, a few notches? Then check out the University of Northern British Columbia’s Northern BC Adventures. From ghost towns to grizzly bears, these educational adventures get you into some of the most inaccessible places in northwest BC.