Tabor Mountain’s Trapper’s Shack

“8 trout-good fishing, also replaced stove pipe with larger ones 5”. No more smoke in cabin,” wrote Willie Kwiatkowski on December 28, 1977 in a tattered spiral-ring journal.”

This 39 year old journal can be found  in the cobweb covered rafters of an old backcountry cabin south of the Tabor Mountain fire tower, near the headwaters of Bowes creek. Called the “Old Trapper’s Shack,” this cabin is just one of the fantastic cultural features found in the Tabor Mountain Recreation Area , just fifteen  minutes east of Prince George. If your’e looking for some summer or winter adventure then this area is a must see!


Tabor Mountain Recreation Area Trail Map

You can access this historic cabin by mountain bike, walking, skis or ATV. Park at the junction of Giscome and Groveburn road, heading south to the junction of the Tower and VOR Forest Service Road. Its all uphill from here. Follow the VOR road east, until you reach the first switchback, where you can see the fire tower to the north. Take the narrow Frost Lake Multiuse Trail for about 1.8 kms, then head south down a narrow trail. This descent is heavily rutted and brushy. The trail eventually flattens out in treed wetland. The narrow trapper’s trail is covered with knee high grass, horsetail, balsam fir and spruce. Follow this trail, north along the edge of the wetland until you see the cabin.

You will have to cross a  makeshift bridge over  the creek that feeds the wetland. Proceed with caution.

This cabin is dry and drafty with a functioning wood stove. However, there is a a lot of mouse and squirrel waste, so I would not recommend sleeping in the cabin unless it is thoroughly swept out.

The old claw-foot stove.

While trapping may seem distasteful to some, it was a source of revenue for First Nations and immigrants during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Indeed, there is a small handful of people that still trap this region today.

The spiral-ringed journal from the 1970s found in the rafters.
Another Journals from the 1980s.

The wetland adjacent to the cabin.

Cultural features such as this trapper’s cabin are an important source of data on Tabor Mountain’s environmental history. I find it interesting that there were trout–or perhaps there still are–in this wetland, begging the question: how did they get there?

With hundreds of kilometers of multi-use trails, the Tabor Mountain Recreation Area is an outdoor adventure person’s paradise. For more info about riding this area, check out my other posts, Fatbiking Tabor Mountain and Tabor Mountain Recreation Area: Prince George’s Best Kept Mountain Biking Secret.

Free Five-Star Accommodations in Northern British Columbia

Northern British Columbia is well known for its accessible mountains, rivers, lakes and unlimited opportunities for adventure: It’s an outdoors person’s paradise! But did you know that the north also has some of the best free five-star accommodations anywhere? Next time you’re planning a backcountry adventure include a stay in one of these luxury cabins.

1. Morfee Mountain

This brand new backcountry cabin is located approximately 15 kilometers up the Morfee Mountain Forest Service Road, just outside Mackenzie, BC. Check out The Morfee Mountain Hop for more info.

 

2.  The “Old Trappers Cabin” 

It’s a tough ride into this almost all-inclusive cabin on Tabor Mountain. However, its well worth the effort. Its dry, has a cool wood stove and you get to spend some quality time with a family of mice and some squirrels. Apparently there are rainbow trout in the adjacent wetland. No outhouse included. Check out the Tabor Mountain Recreation Society for access and trail info.

3. The Troll Lake Cabin

This fantastic Tabor Mountain cabin has a great view of Troll Lake and is only a two kilometer ride or hike from Tower Road. While there is no outhouse or functioning wood stove, there is definitely a roof over your head and a door that closes. For access info download the  Tabor Mt. Recreation Society access map.

 

4. McBride Mountain Shelter

Windows and doors are not included in this mid-mountain shelter. However, the 180 degree view of Robson Valley view is second to none. Also included is an  outhouse, 50 meters down the road!  With a only a 7 kilometer ride, hike or drive up the unmaintained forest service road, you will want to add this chalet to your bucket list. For more info about McBride mountain click on McBride Mountain Madness.

5. McBride Mountain Fire Lookout

If the mid-mountain cabin is booked, then simply ride or hike another 8 kilometers to this alpine retreat. With windows, a door and a roof, what’s not to like about this retreat center?

6. Livingstone Springs Trapper’s Cabin

This heritage cabin is only a seven kilometer ride or hike from  Crooked River Provincial Park. With plenty of fresh water, squirrels and mice, you will want to book this accomadation asap.

7. Red (Grizzly Bear) Mountain Backcountry Cabin

All kidding aside, this is an all-inclusive subalpine cabin. Just bring your own food, clothes, and sleeping bag and you’re good-to-go. The cabin includes everything you need for a comfort-filled holiday; from a bbq to cookware, to plush foam mattresses. Grizzly bear, mule deer  and caribou frequent the area so you will have lots of company.  The outhouse has a  stellar view and there is fresh mountain spring water nearby. For more info or to book this cabin go to  the Prince George Backcountry Recreation Society.

8. Portage Mountain Trapper’s Cabin

Located approximately 20 kms west of Hudson’s Hope–near Portage Mountain–this streamlined cabin is apparently not open to the public. It’s nice to look at nonetheless.

9. Great West Life Mobility Park Cabin

This dilapidated yet rustic cabin is adjacent to the Prince George Snow Machine Club at the end of Scott Road. Watch out for the collapsing metal sheeting on the veranda and the broken glass inside. It will keep you dry in a pinch. Click here for more info about the Great West Life Mobility Park.

10. The Partially Completed Cranbrook Hill Cabin

This windowless, doorless and roofless cabin is only a short ride from UNBC. You will need a ladder and tarp if you’re spending the night in this unit.