7 Reasons to Winter Ride

Cold, blue-steel skies. The rhythmic sound of the drive train.  The soft crunch of tires on -20 Celsius snow.  Winter fatbiking can be an intense visual and tactile experience. More than that, you can access places that you just can’t get to during the summer and fall. Frozen lakes, wetlands and shorelines are just some of the cool features of winter riding in northern British Columbia. Get your boots and gloves on and lets ride.

Riding the perimeter of a frozen lake is a fantastic way of seeing something familiar but from a different perspective. Shoreline vegetation is dormant, naked and brittle brown. The deep is covered by a crunchy blanket of white. The lake seems less mysterious and more one dimensional. If you pick a remote lake, you will see no one: it can be quite eerie.

Animals are much easier to locate and track in the winter. Moose, red fox, coyotes, wolves and other species stand out against the frozen landscape. These bizarre tracks crossed the lake for a hundred meters then disappeared into an alder-choked wetland.

Forests look different in the winter. This stand of snow-pressed balsam fir and spruce collapsed over the trail taunting me to, “run the gauntlet.” I made it through unscathed. Mature conifers regularly fall down across the trail. No one, as far as I know, has ever been crushed on these trails.

Snow covered single track becomes smooth and flowy, once the roots, rocks and depressions are covered and packed down. There is very little snow this year, and these trails still rattle your cage.

Winter riding takes more effort and calories, especially on a fatbike with five inch tires. My legs burned during my first winter.

Winter is a relief from the always present bruin. If you live in grizzly and black bear country, you get to put away your bear spray after November. Oh yeah, the bugs are gone as well.

Building a fire, making hot coffee and starring at the embers is a great reward on a cold day. Humans have been doing this for millennia. The communal fire is where stories were told, wisdom shared and identity created: fire is primal. Take some time from your hectic, high-tech life to do this.

Winter riding can be intensely cold but also visually stunning. Frozen fingers and toes are offset by access to new areas, sights, sounds and  experiences. In the next couple of month looks for posts on how to stay warm while winter riding as well as essential gear for Riding the Wild!